Message from the President

04/15/13

Dear colleagues and friends,

Two years into the process, the University’s 2011-2016 strategic plan has moved full speed ahead into the implementation phase. The hard work that the hundreds of faculty, staff, and students from each of our seven schools put in to create the document is now bearing fruit.

The plan’s eight themes and four fundamental elements are evolving from future possibilities to current realities thanks to 134 tactics—actionable, measurable steps in the strategic plan that move the University toward its goal of being greater than the sum of its parts.

In my February newsletter, we were happy to bring you the compelling news that the plan’s Executive Implementation Committee (EIC) had approved more than $2 million in internal funding to support the strategic plan. This included $1.25 million in one-time University expenditures related to the strategic plan and $1 million in recurring expenditures.

The funded areas, encompassing 59 of the tactics, cover a broad cross-section of the strategic plan and are available for your review at Implementation Summary Report - FY 2013.

Some other themes and tactics did not require funding or will be considered for funding in subsequent years. In my April newsletter, we told you how the four fundamental elements of the strategic plan— information technology, communications, government and external affairs, and faculty and staff training—continue to emerge as essential components of all the themes.

Bottom line: All sections of the strategic plan are important and emphasize an enhancement to how we do our work. This requires allocation of the valuable resource of our people power and denotes an important culture shift in how our University proudly operates as Seven Schools | One University.

We can rest assured that, by devoting our collective talents and abilities, and more than $2 million, to the strategic plan implementation, we are gathering momentum in this exciting initiative to which so many of you have contributed.

Jay A. Perman, MD
President, University of Maryland, Baltimore