• Video: Be Engaged in Our Communities

    This video aims to provide UMB students with an inside perspective about Baltimore. It is intended as an orientation to working in our neighboring communities and includes stories from community members, UMB students and staff, and UMB President Jay A. Perman. Listening to others share what they love about Baltimore is intended to spark curiosity and lead to greater interest in community engagement.   

  • See course description below.

    See course description below.

  • The number of UMB students who are engaged in service learning for credit at sites in Baltimore is growing every year. Thanks to a generous grant from the Joseph and Harvey Meyerhoff Family Charitable Funds, we now have an interactive map of our community service learning locations. Visit the map.

  • A School of Nursing student greets community members at the Urban Business Center's Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

    A School of Nursing student greets community members at the Urban Business Center's Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

  • School of Dentistry students volunteer to educate community members on oral health at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

    School of Dentistry students volunteer to educate community members on oral health at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

  • A University of Maryland School of Medicine Jacques Initiative volunteer talks with another volunteer.

    A University of Maryland School of Medicine Jacques Initiative volunteer talks with another volunteer.

  • The Baltimore City Fire Department brings its big truck to the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

    The Baltimore City Fire Department brings its big truck to the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

  • Baltimore City Fire Department officials demonstrate CPR at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

    Baltimore City Fire Department officials demonstrate CPR at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

  • CBEL Faculty Fellow Clemencia Vargas, DDS, PhD, right, is shown with another School of Dentistry faculty member and a dental student at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

    CBEL Faculty Fellow Clemencia Vargas, DDS, PhD, right, is shown with another School of Dentistry faculty member and a dental student at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

  • A nursing student greets community members at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

    A nursing student greets community members at the Fast Track to Health Community Health Fair.

  • Theda Rose, PhD, MSW, School of Social Work, with co-principal investigators Corey Shdaimah, PhD, and Dante de Tablan, MSW, executive director of the Ben Franklin Center for Community Schools, discuss "Through the Looking Glass: Benjamin Franklin High School PhotoVoice Project" at the CBEL Community Grants Awards Celebration on Sept. 21, 2015.

    Theda Rose, PhD, MSW, School of Social Work, with co-principal investigators Corey Shdaimah, PhD, and Dante de Tablan, MSW, executive director of the Ben Franklin Center for Community Schools, discuss "Through the Looking Glass: Benjamin Franklin High School PhotoVoice Project" at the CBEL Community Grants Awards Celebration on Sept. 21, 2015.

  • Joan Davitt, PhD, MLSP, MSW, School of Social Work, with Naomi Duffort and Chava Ball of Northwest Neighbors Connecting, discuss "Aging in Place in Baltimore: Evaluation of a Hub & Spoke Village Model" at the CBEL Community Grants Awards Celebration on Sept. 21, 2015.

    Joan Davitt, PhD, MLSP, MSW, School of Social Work, with Naomi Duffort and Chava Ball of Northwest Neighbors Connecting, discuss "Aging in Place in Baltimore: Evaluation of a Hub & Spoke Village Model" at the CBEL Community Grants Awards Celebration on Sept. 21, 2015.

  • Elizabeth Weber, Polly Reinecker, and Megan Thomas discuss their CBEL Community Grant, "Making Connections-University Collaboration in Southwest Baltimore" at the CBEL Community Grants Awards Celebration on Sept. 21, 2015.

    Elizabeth Weber, Polly Reinecker, and Megan Thomas discuss their CBEL Community Grant, "Making Connections-University Collaboration in Southwest Baltimore" at the CBEL Community Grants Awards Celebration on Sept. 21, 2015.

Our Mission

The center previously known as the University of Maryland, Baltimore Center for Community-Based Engagement and Learning (CBEL) has merged with the Center for Global Education Initiatives to un-silo the work that strives to address issues and improve lives in local and global communities. The mission from the local perspective remains the same — to coordinate, guide, and enhance opportunities for community-based student and faculty engagement, scholarship, service, and learning to improve the health and welfare of the West Baltimore community.  If you have any questions about community engagement at UMB, please, contact the Senior  Director for Community Engagement for the Center for Global Education Initiatives, Dr. Lori Edwards.

Collaboration Across Campus and Outside Partners

CIPP 970: Interprofessional Service, Social Justice and Our Community

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) is offering a service-learning course to all UMB students 

Students will receive hands-on, professional experience with community health programs by working with partner organizations in the community surrounding UMB.

Through service learning, students will learn how community health programs are developed, organized, implemented, and evaluated as well as how interprofessional teams successfully function, how to interact with individuals and groups living in our community, and how to report on their observations to peers and supervisors.

Students who wish to take this course will register through their school’s normal registration process.

Course Description

  • CIPP 970: Interprofessional Service - Social Justice and Our Community
  • Offered in fall and spring semesters
  • Course credit: 1 credit hour (tuition-free)
  • Hosting school: University of Maryland, Baltimore Graduate School
  • Course location: UMB Community Engagement Center, 870 W. Baltimore St.
  • Instructor: Lori Edwards, DrPH, MPH, RN, PHCNS-BC
  • Email: edwards@umaryland.edu
  • Office: 410-706-1929

Course Introduction and Goals

This course links the experiential with the theoretical by providing hands-on professional experience in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s surrounding community. Students from all University programs are encouraged to enroll in this course.

Providing true service learning is the ultimate goal of this course in which students will learn by providing for the expressed need of the community. Students will learn how community health programs (broadly defined) are developed, organized, implemented, and evaluated; how interprofessional teams successfully function; how to interact with individuals and groups living in our community; and how to report their observations to peers and supervisors. Students will work with organizations with which the University has formed partnerships to meet the course learning objectives. Students will be required to reflect on the service-learning experience in formal written reflections.

Service learning is a form of experiential education in which students engage in activities that address human and community needs together with structured opportunities intentionally designed to promote student learning and development. Reflection is a key element of service learning. It is one of the elements that differentiates service learning from community service. Equally important in differentiating service learning from community service is reciprocity between the person providing the service and the person receiving the service. Through the reciprocity associated with service learning, students gain a better sense of belonging to that community while community members are empowered to address and advocate for their own needs.

Course Learning Objectives

  • Students will be able to explain the connection between course content and their service experiences.
  • Students will be able to paraphrase the definition of social justice.
  • Students will be able to give examples of the root causes of social injustice in the community in which they are doing their service project.
  • Students will be able to differentiate service from social change as they relate to their service-learning experience.
  • Students will be able to define characteristics and value of an interdisciplinary educational (IPE) approach to service learning.

Course Prerequisites

  • Successful completion of background check, if required by service site.

Course Requirements

Students will be matched with a community partner and complete 40 hours of service learning with the partner organization, a minimum of five hours of classroom training, and a series of assignments (see “Grading” below). The classroom content will include principles of service learning, community engagement, and strategies for working in a reciprocal relationship with community partners.

Community partners will be selected from among community organizations with which UMB CBEL and faculty fellows have working relationships. Examples of partner organizations include Jacques Initiative, Southwest Partnership, International Refugee Committee, and Hollins House (mixed population housing).

Students will work in small interprofessional groups of three to five students for their community project. They will meet with the community-based organization (CBO) partner during the first week of the semester to learn more about the CBO, the population they represent, and to discuss the projects that may be undertaken to meet the goals of the organization and community that they represent. The student team and CBO will jointly decide on an approach to the project that will utilize the student expertise and meet community goals. The students and CBO will establish a deliverable/”take home” product and make plans for meeting the course requirements.

HIPAA Statement

HIPPA regulations establish uniform rules for protecting the health information and privacy of our patients. You may not see or use protected health information unless it is required for your clinical assignment. Protected health information is any information that identifies an individual, could be used to identify an individual, describes the health care condition or payment of an individual, and/or describes the demographics of an individual.

Required Readings

  • Dharamsi, S.; Espinoza, N., Cramer, C., Amin, M, Bainbridge, L., & Poole, G. (2010). Nurturing social responsibility through community service-learning: Lesson learned from a pilot project. Medical Teacher. 32: 905-911.
  • Lee, Michael. (2016). Just because you do ‘good’ work doesn’t mean you are good. Blog. Accessed Jan. 10, 2016. http://www.michaelleewrites.com/blog/just-because-you-do-good-work-doesnt-mean-you-are-good
  • Wen, L. and Rawlings-Blake, S. (2016). Baltimore City Health Department, White Paper, State of Health in Baltimore: Summary of key issues, services, and policies. (Winter 2016). Issue 8: Population Health and Health in All Policies.
  • Additional required readings are posted in Blackboard

Class Meetings

Students will meet with faculty instructors during the course of the semester at least three times, and more as needed. The first meeting will occur in the first weeks of the semester and will be an orientation to the course, principles of service-learning, and an orientation to the community and the partners. Meetings will generally occur at the Community Engagement Center. The second meeting will serve as a mid-semester, all-students group check-in and interprofessional peer mentoring. The final meeting will include all students presenting their “take home” product and include group discussions about the experiences throughout the semester.

Grading Information

This is a one-semester pass/fail course in which students will have until the end of the semester to complete the 45 hours of training, community service, and reflection.

Each project may require separate time commitments and responsibilities. Students will be evaluated on the completion of their service-learning project requirements, including: 

  1. Professionalism: The student maintains the expected level of professionalism during the course.
  2. Service-subject matter relation: Service activities allow students to apply what they have learned during their professional program.
  3. Class contemplates learning through service: The students must document service activities on a weekly basis as well as record reflections on their experience in the community, submit a mid-semester sample weekly reflection, and submit a final reflections paper. Mid-semester and end-of-semester submissions.
  4. Service recipients evaluate service: Sponsoring agencies will be asked to evaluate the service activities.
  5. Interdisciplinary learning:  Students may learn from each other through different skills or attributes in providing information or in "people" skills or professional practice. In addition, the group reflection sessions will permit the students to learn from each other in different activities in which they have participated.

Grading Criteria

  1. Course preparation, attendance, and engagement (10 percent)
  2. Weekly logs and mid semester reflections (10 percent)
  3. Final course reflection paper (30 percent)
  4. CBO mentor evaluation of student’s performance (20 percent)
  5. Group project report or presentation (30 percent) 

Reflection

Reflection is one of the most critical pieces of service learning. It is the structured time in which students move from participation to deeper understanding. We want students to think about their experiences not only in the context of what they actually did, but also about how their experiences relate to their lives in a bigger sense and the decisions they will make in the future. All reflection activities should come back to the central question of how the service is connected to the learning and how it is connected to each student’s personal development.

Examples of student reflection activities*

  • Keep an ongoing journal with specific reflection questions throughout the project.
  • Compose a letter to one of the service recipients or to a politician.
  • Write a poem that reflects your experience for that week.
  • Explain what scientific knowledge would help you with the project and why; see if you can get that information.
  • Compile statistics on your project and compare them to other data available for similar circumstances.
  • Create a skit based on your project and perform it for the class/school/parents.

*Note: These guidelines have been adapted from Loyola University, New Orleans 

Download pdf course syllabus

CBEL and SWCOS Service Learning Map

CBEL in partnership with the Social Work Community Outreach Service (SWCOS) developed an interactive map to inform campus and community members about where UMB students are engaged in service learning activities as part of an academic course, not as co-curricular (volunteer) activities. Visit the map.

Research and Scholarship

  • CBEL provided grants to faculty and students to support pilot research to advance community-based service, learning, and scholarship conducted in partnership with communities surrounding UMB. Click here to see our grantees.
  • CBEL launched the inaugural Faculty Fellows Program for Community-Based Service and Scholarship in 2015. This Universitywide program consists of faculty from all six professional schools who lead community engagement across the campus.
  • CBEL connected UMB faculty with community partners and provided faculty with technical assistance in grant preparation.