Episode Archive

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Episode 11: Hispanic, Latino, Latinx?

What are the differences between the terms "Hispanic", "Latino", and "Latinx" and how should we define one of the largest growing ethnic groups in the United States? In this episode, we provide a brief history of the terms and how this identity has come to evolve over time. You'll also hear from Dr. Isabelita Rambob, DDS, an assistant professor at the School of Dentistry, and Rosemary Ferreira, MEd, who share their personal experiences identifying as Latinas. (Transcript: Hispanic, Latino, Latinx) 

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Episode 10: But Did My Parents 'Make It?': Reflections on Becoming Upwardly Mobile from a Daughter of Working-Class Immigrants

Upward mobility is considered a cornerstone of the American Dream, but what about the personal, communal, and cultural sacrifices made to achieve this dream? What about the guilt and dissonance that some first-generation college graduates express from transitioning into a social class different from their family and community members? 

In this episode Rosemary Ferreira, M.Ed. reflects on her experiences with upward mobility as she transitions from growing up in a working-class household to being the first in her family to graduate college to becoming a higher education professional. She interviews her mother, Maria Ferreira, to unpack her mixed emotions about her upward mobility and to hear about her mother's experience as a working-class immigrant. (Transcript: But Did My Parents 'Make It?') 

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Episode 9: Invisible/Hypervisible: Southwest Asian and North African Communities in the U.S.

Southwest Asian and North African (SWANA) is an increasingly popular term to identify people from countries such as Afghanistan, Egypt, Iran, and Syria. In the U.S., SWANA communities toddle between invisibility due to the U.S. Census Bureau's decision not to develop a distinct SWANA race and/or ethnicity category and hypervisibility due to stereotypical depictions of SWANA people as violent and barbaric (ever listen to the introductory song of that popular Disney movie Aladdin?). In this episode, we unpack SWANA invisibility/hypervisibility with Sama Sabihi, M.A., program coordinator for the Women in Engineering program at the University of Maryland, College Park. (Transcript: Invisible/Hypervisible: Southwest Asian & North African Communities)
 

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Episode 8: Honoring Pride Month

In honor of Pride month, we are releasing a special episode that provides a brief history of Pride, its roots in the Stonewall uprising against police, and the present-day struggles that LGBTQ+ people experience, particularly Trans Women of Color. We also invited three staff members at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Gregory Brightbill, MEd, MBA, associate director for student leadership and involvement in the Intercultural Leadership and Engagement unit, Zanne Gogan, testing center coordinator for Educational Support and Disability Services, and Mishawn Smith, MPA, executive administrative assistant at the School of Nursing's diversity and inclusion office, to share what Pride means to them. If you're interested in learning about additional LGBTQ+ resources, be sure to check out the transcript of this episode for a list of local and national LGBTQ+ activists and organizations. (Transcript: Honoring Pride)
 

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Episode 7: Juneteenth: A Day of Celebration and Remembrance

156 years after the first Juneteenth was celebrated in Galveston, Texas, companies and organizations across the U.S. are officially recognizing Juneteenth as a paid holiday. So, what is the history of Juneteenth, how do we celebrate it, and why are some people only just hearing about it? In this episode we are joined by Danielle Harris, LCSW-C, associate director of the Community Engagement Center, Chrishna Williams, director of alumni relations at the School of Social Work, and Seanté Hatcher, LCSW-C, associate dean for continuing professional education at the School of Social Work, three Black women who share their experiences and thoughts about the holiday and its significance not only in Black history, but American history. (Transcript: Juneteenth A Day of Celebration and Remembrance)
 

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Episode 6: Anti-Asian Racism is Not New (Part Two)

In part two of the Anti-Asian Racism is Not New series, we talk to Crystal Han, MD and Angeline Pham, MD about their group Crazy Stressed Asians, a support group for Asian and Asian American students at UMB and other local universities. We also discuss the impact of racial trauma on the mental health and overall well-being of Asians and Asian Americans and Communities of Color, more broadly. (Transcript: Anti-Asian Racism Is Not New Part Two)
 

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Episode 5: Anti-Asian Racism is Not New (Part One)

In this two-part series, we invited Crystal Han, MD and Angeline Pham, MD, psychiatry residents at the University of Maryland/Sheppard Pratt, and the facilitators of the Crazy Stressed Asians group at UMB, to discuss anti-Asian racism and its impact on the mental health and well-being of Asians and Asian Americans.  

Part one focuses on the history of anti-Asian racism in the U.S. and how to build solidarity movements across racial and ethnic groups. (Transcript: Anti-Asian Racism Is Not New Part One

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Episode 4: Capitalizing the B in Black: The Importance of Race and Language

Language is a powerful tool that allows for people to make meaning of themselves and the world they live in. How can we ensure that the language we use is also racially aware and inclusive? Our guest for this episode is James Wright, MFA, associate director of the Writing Center and associate faculty member in the Science Communication Program at the Graduate School. Together, we discuss the impact of social media and the 2020 racial justice protests on the decision to capitalize the B in Black by major news outlets. We also discuss how to incorporate inclusive language in academia. (Transcript: Capitalizing the B in Black)

 

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Episode 3: Why are White American Women Posing as Black and Latinx Women?

Cultural leeching? Blackfishing? Racial fraud? What do we name the recent phenomenon of white American women such as Jessica Krug and Rachel Dolezal posing as Black and Latinx women? Listen in as Courtney and Rosemary unpack this phenomenon with Kyla Liggett-Creel, PhD, assistant clinical professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. (Transcript: White American Women Posting as Black and Latinx Women)
 

 

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Episode 2: Voter Suppression in the U.S.

Could you identify how many bubbles are on a bar of soap? For decades, questions like these were used to deter Black people from voting. While some of the tactics have changed throughout time, the goal to suppress the right to vote from Black people and other historically marginalized communities has not. Listen in as Courtney and Rosemary discuss the history (and current-day issue) of voter suppression in the U.S. In this episode we are joined by Mr. Nicholson, a Black Vietnam veteran who grew up in Alabama during the 1960s. (Transcript: Voter Suppression)

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Episode 1: What is the Intercultural Center?

In June of 2020, the Intercultural Center (IC) was founded as a space of belonging for historically underrepresented students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. In this episode, we are joined by two of the leading players in the establishment of the IC, Patty Alvarez, PhD, the Assistant Vice President of Student Affairs and Vanessa Gonzalez-Wright, MSW, an active student leader and alum of the School of Social Work. (Transcript: What is the Intercultural Center)

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Trailer: Welcome to The Table

Learning about our identities and the identities of others can be a messy and complicated process. That's why we're launching The Table, a podcast that will unpack questions regarding race, ethnicity, culture, norms, and current events. New episodes will be released every month. (Transcript: Welcome to the Table).

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Episode 12: Colorism in the Black, Asian, and Latinx Communities

“You’re pretty for a dark-skinned girl” and “don’t play outside in the sun, you’ll get too dark” are comments that are sometimes overheard in Communities of Color. They highlight the issue of colorism, which is a form of prejudice and/or discrimination that values lighter skin tones over darker skin tones, specifically within the same racial and/or ethnic group.

In this episode you'll hear from three individuals who speak to their respective experiences with colorism within the Black, Asian, and Latinx communities, Lisa Nicholson, a healthcare manager, Reina Pomeroy, MSW, a certified coach at Reina + Co, and Ayda Gonzalez, MS, a recent graduate student from Emory University. (Transcript: Colorism in the Black, Asian, and Latinx Communities)

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Episode 13: Fat Isn't Bad, Anti-Fat Bias Is

As the end of the year approaches, we may become more aware of the messages from the media, our families, or ourselves that are centered on losing weight. The pressure to lose weight can be tied to negative perceptions of fat as evidence of a person's lack of self-control, laziness, or failure to care for themselves. These negative perceptions are what many fat activists and scholars are naming as anti-fat bias. We're dedicating this episode to unpacking the history and present-day impacts of how anti-fat bias and weight stigma, not solely fat itself, harms and dehumanizes people who are deemed as "overweight" or "obese" in our society. 

In this episode, you'll hear from three guests, Tierra Major Kearney, the prevention and outreach program coordinator at the UMB Student Counseling Center (SCC), Chaia Grubbs, LCSW-C a licensed clinical social worker and senior counselor at the UMB SCC, and Ariana Meinster, a final year student at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. They'll share their experiences and suggestions for dismantling anti-fat bias. (Transcript: Fat Isn't Bad, Anti-Fat Bias Is)

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