Individual Student Experiences Funded by CGEI

  • "Above all, the relationships and conversations I have had during my brief time in this part of the world have been truly amazing. Saroeun Sek, IJM’s lead lawyer in the Cambodian office, is a case study in inspiration and fortitude in the fight against injustice."

    Joshua Carback, School of Law, Cambodia Summer 2016

    UMB law student Joshua Carback worked as a legal intern with his mentor, Saroeun Sek, for the International Justice Mission's (IJM) Cambodian office combating sex trafficking.

    UMB law student Joshua Carback worked as a legal intern with his mentor, Saroeun Sek, for the International Justice Mission's (IJM) Cambodian office combating sex trafficking.

  • "The trip to Rwanda was incredible on many levels. On a professional level, seeing the way health care and dentistry is done in Rwanda informed my understanding of dentistry in the United States. Going on the trip with a pharmacy student and working with pharmacy, medical, and dental students gave me a greater big-picture understanding of the health care field that I am part of. Continuing to work on the projects we started in Rwanda is very exciting, and I am personally grateful for all the learning and experience this trip afforded me!"

    Rebecca Salzman, School of Dentistry, Rwanda 2015

    UMB students were invited to the town of Huye by leaders of the Rwandan Village Concept Project. RVCP brings children and adults together for community building, and here they gather to learn traditional dance. The dance group performs for events and generates income for their community.

    UMB students were invited to the town of Huye by leaders of the Rwandan Village Concept Project. RVCP brings children and adults together for community building, and here they gather to learn traditional dance. The dance group performs for events and generates income for their community.

  • “Participating in the interprofessional global health experience reinvigorated my passion for working in the Baltimore community. From a global perspective, I learned that our world is large and our cultures may be different, but we can learn from each other to improve the conditions in our own communities. I learned that working collaboratively with other disciplines is an effective approach to tackling complex issues that negatively affect our communities. Experiential learning has had a great impact on my educational experience and my professional practice. I am a better person and nurse because of it.”

    Rachael Parran, School of Nursing, Israel 2015

    UMB and Haifa students engage in a discussion about environmental issues. The students hold examples of environmental protest signs from a grassroots advocacy group opposing the expansion of petroleum processing.

    UMB and Haifa students engage in a discussion about environmental issues. The students hold examples of environmental protest signs from a grassroots advocacy group opposing the expansion of petroleum processing.

  • "In working with clinicians and educators, we, as physical therapists, can effect change on a very human level through promoting function and movement as well as developing cross-cultural ties in this ever-diversifying global community."

    Samatha DuFlo, School of Medicine-Physical Therapy, Malawi 2013

    Laurie Neely, PT, DPT, interim director of clinical education and instructor, School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, observes George Chimatiro practice a vestibular examination technique.

    Laurie Neely, PT, DPT, interim director of clinical education and instructor, School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, observes George Chimatiro practice a vestibular examination technique.

  • "Through my experience, I learned the impact of resource availability on the concept of professional responsibility. In the United States, we tend to define professionalism and professional responsibility as a personal or moral choice. However, in underdeveloped or developing countries, it is based on the availability of resources and governmental investment — things that professionals tend to have little control over."

    Catherine Lee, School of Law, Malawi Law Project 2015

    Buildings and property were labeled with donation acknowledgements throughout the law school at Chancellor College.

    Buildings and property were labeled with donation acknowledgements throughout the law school at Chancellor College.

  • "After working with other students and interacting with patients and health care professionals in Malawi, I finally gained some understanding of the inextricable link between culture, politics, and the provision of health care. I now understand that when it comes to health care, what seems to be a simple problem with easy solutions may not be simple at all — it may have some underlying complicated social, cultural, and political causes, all of which must be considered in order to develop effective, culturally acceptable solutions. This experience helped me to finally understand why treatable and preventable infectious diseases continue to be a major problem in many developing countries."

    Wilhelmina Lord-Adem, School of Pharmacy, Malawi 2014

    UMB students Wilhemina Lord-Adem, Sarah Kaslow, and Mena Gaballah meet with Malawi village leaders, health workers, and school staff.

    UMB students Wilhemina Lord-Adem, Sarah Kaslow, and Mena Gaballah meet with Malawi village leaders, health workers, and school staff.

  • "The interprofessional grant provided an incredible opportunity to be immersed in Hong Kong culture and to see firsthand how end-of-life care is provided there. The experience allowed for a more well-rounded understanding of our own fields of study as well as those of our interdisciplinary team."
    — Eric Leikus, School of Nursing

    "I learned a lot from the Hong Kong nurses and health providers from different hospitals and how comprehensive their palliative services are. I was especially touched by stories told by families of a patient and how good nursing care can really change someone's life."
    — Kwan Ngai, School of Dentistry
    Hong Kong 2015

    UMB students traveled to Hong Kong to understand end-of-life communication methods. From left: Tiffany Yu, Kwan Ngai, Brittany Touchon, and Eric Leikus.

    UMB students traveled to Hong Kong to understand end-of-life communication methods. From left: Tiffany Yu, Kwan Ngai, Brittany Touchon, and Eric Leikus.

  • "I learned that there are more similarities than differences in the health care delivery practices in the USA and Ghana. Nurses and midwives struggled with issues of stigma and disclosure among the HIV/AIDS patient population. These same struggles exist in the USA. While there seems to be a stigma associated with HIV/AIDS overall in Ghana, I did not observe stigmatization from the health care providers. I think we have something to learn from the nurses and midwives who work in an empathetic, encouraging, and non-judging way with the HIV/AIDS patient population."

    Natalie Mette-Bory, School of Nursing, Ghana 2015

  •  “I am a more sympathetic individual. I returned with a passion for public health and knowing how pharmacy fits into the bigger picture, having seen a glimpse of the pharmaceutical distribution system through the hospitals and clinics largely due to PEPFAR funding. While Malawi and other developing countries may not have the same access or funding for health resources as the U.S., the people there strive toward health and happiness to the best of what is available to them.”

    Alicia Chen, School of Pharmacy, Malawi 2010

    UMB students Alicia Chen and Ajoke Agboola in Malawi.

    UMB students Alicia Chen and Ajoke Agboola in Malawi.

  • “[Here] you see me working with a Rwandan dental student on waxing a tooth as part of his Dental Anatomy and Occlusion course. At UMB, we have state-of-the-art facilities and equipment and use overhead operatory lights, Bunsen burners, and personally issued sets of waxing instruments in order to shape the anatomy of the teeth. In Rwanda, the students were sharing candles and using a limited number of instruments, many of which were not designed for waxing or were broken. Despite the limited resources, the majority of the students were not only able to produce impressive wax-ups but also demonstrated an enthusiastic passion toward their dental studies. The month in Rwanda was an amazing eye-opener, and an enriching cultural and professional experience." Rwanda 2014

    UMB dentistry student Michael Klausner, right, works with his new Rwandan dental student colleague, Jean Damascene, during his interprofessional project in Rwanda, 2014.

    UMB dentistry student Michael Klausner, right, works with his new Rwandan dental student colleague, Jean Damascene, during his interprofessional project in Rwanda, 2014.

  • "I researched Rwanda before traveling and became interested in the people’s attitude toward Paul Kagame, who has been in power for years. A Rwandan colleague told me, 'He is very popular here because he has shown people that they can live above their differences.' It’s hard for people like me who have grown up with an abundance of civil liberties to understand how people can be happy with so many rules: You can’t walk on the grass or in parks, there is no street art or street vendors or music playing. However, the more I learned of Rwanda’s history, especially the genocide, the more I understood his point. After years of fighting and conflict, whatever semblance of peace you can have is worth preserving."

    Brooke Hyman, School of Medicine, Rwanda 2015

    Women work in the fields in Kigali, Rwanda. The photo was taken by Brooke Hyman, who traveled to Rwanda as a global health grantee in 2015.

    Women work in the fields in Kigali, Rwanda. The photo was taken by Brooke Hyman, who traveled to Rwanda as a global health grantee in 2015.