Hazard of Contents

The Hazard of Contents, as defined in NFPA 101, the Life Safety Code, is the relative danger of the start and spread of fire, the danger of smoke or gas generation, and the danger of explosion of other occurrence potentially endangering the lives and safety of the occupants of the building or structure.

Hazard of contents is determined on the basis of the character of the contents and the processes or operations conducted in the building or structure.

Where different degrees of hazard of contents exists in different parts of a building or structure, the more hazardous  situation will govern the classification.

The hazard of contents of any building or structure are classified as either low, ordinary, or high hazard in accordance with NFPA 101, the Life Safety Code.

Hazardous areas include, but are not limited to, areas for general storage, boiler or furnace rooms, fuel storage, chemical storage, janitor closets, maintenance shops, including woodworking and painting areas, and kitchens as defined in Chapters 8 through 30, NFPA 101, the Life Safety Code.  Refer to the Definitions section for a more explicit explanation.

The hazard of contents of any building or structure is classified as low, ordinary, or high.

Low Hazard - Low hazard contents are classified as those of such low combustibility that no self-propagating fire therein can occur.

Ordinary Hazard - Ordinary hazard contents are classified as those that are likely to burn with moderate rapidity or to give off a considerable volume of smoke.

High Hazard -  High hazard contents are classified as those that are likely to burn with extreme rapidity or from which explosions are likely.